Brainetics Review?

I just came across this product Brainetics after seeing someone tweeting about it but as soon as I read its introductory page I began thinking of the Just Another Scam story. Could it be? Where do I find a review of the product?

asked by Arizona in Toys | 232274 views | 09-12-2009 at 07:40 PM

Last year, Mike Byster created the popular Brainetics educational system that teaches math and memory skills. It was
quickly awarded a 2008 Parents' Choice Gold Award but now the rumor on several blogs and social networks is that Brainetics is a scam.

Sold via infomercial, Brainetics is very popular among homeschooling families. The educational program package includes DVDs, educational playing cards, and a workbook that guarantees that users may do better in math, spelling and other subjects using this memory based system. It sells for $99 plus shipping.

Currently there are no complaints with the Better Business Bureau or the Consumer Product Safety Division. The product can be returned for a full refund within 30 days of purchase.

answered by Din | 09-12-2009 at 07:42 PM

Brainetics, so what's the scam?
You didn't mention what the 'scam', I got into reading your thread, but it sure would have been nice for you to 'say' what it was (too much money, waste of time, what???). How about letting us in on what the out come was? Thanks.

answered by Jeanne M. | 12-05-2009 at 02:19 PM

Brainetics?
I have pretty searched a LOT of the places that google is presenting as "Brainetics Scam" info, and have not found a single parent who says it didn't work, a single educator that said it was a scam, a single group saying that their members had been ripped off by buying this product. Most all quote from the same article, which is titled Brainetics Scam, but does not go on to elaborate how it is failing to live up to promise. I hate how one website came make an unsubstantiated claim, and suddenly, it's all over the net. I'd love to hear some actual experiences with the product.

answered by Guest | 02-06-2010 at 02:53 PM

I don't think it trains the steps of a math problem. It might teach via memory, but I don't think the course actually teaches to work through problems of higher math.
We can simply look at the following math problem and can easily figure it out without doing the steps, but it's more important to understand the steps taken to derive the answer.
1+X=3

You can easily see the answer X=2. If you don't know the steps to come up with the answer, how can anyone work through the more difficult math subjects.

Sure it's cute to do parlor tricks with math, squaring numbers and the like, but in reality, children need to be taught where the answer came from and how to work that out. Too many times are we wanting instant gratification for things. Our society has been built on the need to have the answer instantly, without understanding it. Without the deeper levels of thinking, and working down a problem, a society will never reach full potential.

I don't think it's a scam, but i don't think it fully works as advertised, either.

answered by Guest | 02-14-2010 at 10:06 PM

I have to agree w/the post above. I never really struggled w/the type of math that Brainetics is teaching as a child because I was taught how to get the answers by working through the problems. I liked that the kids were able to get the answers quickly but I WOULD NOT buy this for a child that has not mastered how to work through the problems. very quickly through the infomercial (about 4 min) I realized that this was the problem w/Brainetics.
Yes parlor tricks are cool but kids need to know the basis, the foundation of what they are learning. Now when my child is in the 6th grade or older I would get this for her because by that time she should have more than mastered the basic concepts of how to work through math problems and this would just be some additional skills for her to have.

answered by Guest | 02-22-2010 at 10:00 AM

It is easy for people to say that you need to understand how to work through the problem but, what about the children who struggle really badly in math and just have a hard time understanding the steps. You also have the issues of teachers these days who don't take the time to try different methods with the children who are struggling and then they end up failing or the parents end up forking out the money to get the extra help that the child needs. What happened to the Motto no child left behind? I feel like this Brainetics is hope for those children. I have a child who has never gotten anything higher than a D in math and no one seems to want to help her. I have asked the school several times to put her in a help class that assists them with the help that she needs to understand it but, it just seems to do nothing. My child is in the 5th grade and she has been struggling with math since she started math in first grade. I feel like they are stressing these children out with all the pressure in school and don't allow them to be kids. I think this also has a lot to do with the whole ADHD epidemic. No one has time, patience for these children anymore. All the teachers say is more money or you need to pay for your Child's education in order for them to get a higher learning education. Just like the homework thing why do these children come home with tons of homework, what are they doing in class? I did not go to school to become a teacher how am I supposed to help my child if I don't understand how to explain in detail how a problem works? Isn’t this what the teacher gets paid to do? Why does my child get told that they ask too many questions? Is this not what teachers go to college for? You should never tell a child they ask too many questions this is a discouragement for child to hear that.

answered by Guest | 02-28-2010 at 06:41 AM

You definitely should not tell a child they ask too many questions in the classroom. And some children do have a lot of problems in math. But I agree with knowing the theory behind math. If you teach these children shortcuts first, that's all they're going to know. They'll suffer when they get into middle school math and need to understand why the basics are the basics.

I took a statistics class in college--a four hour class with a lab where we had quizzes everyday; if there was no quiz, then there was a test. I was scared to death because I'm not a math person, but it was required for my major. However, since I needed to understand how it related to my major, there was a lot of discussion of the theory behind the math. My tests weren't just producing answers: a lot of my grade was dependent upon showing the steps leading to the answers, then discussing how I got there in a short answer format.

I made A's on every test. I made a low B on the final (because it was cumulative), causing my average to be an 87, 3 points away from an A. However...my professor gave me an A in the class because he knew that I truly did grasp the concepts of statistics. If I'd focused on short cuts, I would have failed the class.

These do seem like interesting short cuts and memory exercises. But it seems like this would be something for a more developed mind instead of a developing one. Kind of like how they say coffee will stunt a child's growth; save the coffee for when you're done growing. (Not that it's true, but if it were it would be a good analogy.)

answered by Guest | 03-05-2010 at 07:13 AM

Brainetics controversy
The "Brainetics" program is a package of helpful calculation and memorization tricks or aids, combined with training the brain to store the numbers used while you perform operations. At least the child is active in the calculation, unlike when a calculator is used, which has pretty much taken over everywhere. (I have even seen COLLEGE STUDENTS add two single-digit numbers with a calculator!)

The big point is this: people are acting concerned that kids "won't learn math right" or won't be able to understand concepts. Give me a break! The two have nothing in common! Calculation is one thing, and concepts another. Both must be taught. Helping one doesn't hurt another! Just the fact that the kids are doing the calculation using their brains rather than punching in on a calculator is not only a big improvement over what usually happens, but by calculating in their heads they are getting some form of concept--or at least intuition-- of what is happening. This doesn't replace a clearly explained concept, but neither does it harm it.

I do not know whether the Brainetics program is worthwhile--although if it can do what it claims, I think it certainly would be. I know I'd like to be able to perform many of the math feats demonstrated. I would probably opt for one of the books available on the subject--if I could manage to take the time to actually put it in practice. Maybe videos and other materials would be helpful in that.

answered by Mike from Shreveport | 03-08-2010 at 05:03 PM

Take a moment and logicly think about it.
I have spent some time looking into this product. Although I have not purchased it yet, waiting until my daughter is old enough, i plan to.

Let me break down my reasons...

One very convincing reason is that it was covered on 20/20, which has a good reputation for reporting, and even their reporter was able to answer some of those crazy math problems. Also, the creator of the system teaches children in the Chicago area, for free, and has been doing so for years. He helped create the system after someone else financed it. So this doesn't seem to be a usual mo for scams.

Also adding in that every negative review I have read online share a few things in common.
1. the author of the review has a problem with the requirements for the program... mainly ... knowing the times tables. 2. Instead of overcoming this problem, by taking the time to learn, they blame the program. 3. The author has not used the product. 4. They lack the understanding that this program is designed to help get to the correct answer faster, and not give you a better understanding of why/ how it works that way. 5. the reviewer is too lazy to actually try and learn the program, and often finds "cosmetic" flaws to be used as reasons for this program not working, when in fact it was them not trying.

Also, looking over all the claims of the program and the reviews, I have come to the conclusion that people will only benefit form this if they have a basic math foundation, meaning that you need to know how to add, multiply, and divide. So it will not work for anyone who doesn't know their times tables, or how to add. This shouldn't discourage people but encourage them to learn their basics.

p.s.

sorry if my spelling is bad.

answered by Guest | 03-16-2010 at 08:11 AM

Mr.
All math equations are tricks and short cuts. The basic math principles are just addition and subtraction. Multiplication table that kids memorize is also a short cut trick.
25X25 is just 25+25+25+25....etc for 25 times no matter how you arrive at the answer.

answered by andy | 03-17-2010 at 10:10 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by andy View Post
All math equations are tricks and short cuts. The basic math principles are just addition and subtraction. Multiplication table that kids memorize is also a short cut trick.
25X25 is just 25+25+25+25....etc for 25 times no matter how you arrive at the answer.

Exactly!!

LOL... Let's be gone with multiplication, honestly, they need to learn the steps to get to the answer of 25 x 25.

answered by Guest | 03-18-2010 at 07:35 AM

Regarding quote 7-Your part of the problem. FIrst of all, you don't need a college degree to help your child with math. Secondly, your child see's how your dealing with this problem, blaming the teacher. When you quit putting all of the responsibilbity on the teacher, perhaps your child will start stepping up to the plate. As a teacher myself, I'm tired of giving 200% and helping my students in every way that I can, going above and beyond, and yet am left to blame when a student doesn't perform. I use many strategies and this brainetics sounds like a nice supplement. A supplement is what it is. It doesn't replace working through concepts. That would be like having students memorize their math facts without teaching them the concepts. I teach concepts but it's also important for the students to be quick and efficient with their math facts for higher level learning to take place. Teaching them little tricks is very helpful. You can pay for Brainetics where some tricks are laid out or you can google math strategies, or mental math tricks etc. and come up with your own for free. Either way, it's worth your child's investment. Please, learn to work WITH your child's teacher, for your child's sake.

answered by Guest | 03-21-2010 at 02:11 AM

Patients is a virtue
In learning it takes patients and a lot of teachers have lost it when it comes to some of the slower learning kids. If we got back to the basics and not stress out our kids they would learn better. Faster is not always the best thing, Slow down and teach the proper way. These are good ways to do things fast but when they get to the higher math their are too many ways to do things and their are no short cuts.

answered by Guest | 03-21-2010 at 12:35 PM

PARENTS NEED TO STEP UP
There are several post here about teachers needing to step up and do more. I for one spend at least 20 hours a week tutoring in my child's school and see how much effort the teachers put in. For post #7 if your child is needing extra help, ask for a tutor if she already has one ask that your child be tested for a disability. I as a parent am also a full time college student and even then I help my daughter every day with math. Even when she says she has no homework, we work on something.

It has to be fun for them too. She bakes while I cook so she is constantly measuring and converting how much a cup of milk is to ounces etc. We are our children's defenders and so WE not the teachers must do what we need to for our children.

If you have no idea how to help your child through 5th grade work then go in and ask the teacher for help yourself. They most times are gracious in helping you work through those problems.

I have yet to meet a teacher who is not willing to help a child. Good luck to you.

answered by Guest | 03-25-2010 at 12:49 PM

Teachers can do only so much!
Thank you Quote #'s 13 and 15 in regard to Quote #7! I don't think I need to add anything to your replies.

The only thing I have to say that has not been said already is that I think the cost is much too high for this product. There are probably many parents out there that may be interested in using this for their child/children but cannot afford it. Some may answer that you should do whatever it takes to help your child. Yes, however, when purchasing something from the internet that you are not certain will help, $150 is a lot of money on which to take a chance. I'm sure the cost it takes to produce the items you get in this program is minimal, and they certainly could afford to offer it at a more reasonable cost so that the average parent could feel more comfortable about purchasing it not really knowing if it will work. I am an educator myself and would be willing to purchase it for some of our students if it didn't cost so much. (I would also be interested in trying it out myself!) Maybe, in time, the price will come down so that more people could afford to risk the money involved.

answered by Guest | 03-25-2010 at 05:59 PM

I need answers from Users of Brainetics, Can you Help?
Has anyone (including previous responders) actually used this product? If so, for how long and what results have you seen?

Has anyone with a child diagnosed with ADHD used this product? If so, for how long and what result have you seen?

Yes, I too believe the price of this program is high, but there are alot of things that cost a lot of money that we buy because we need them or perhaps want them. I am willing to spend the money, I may have to give up something to do that, but if it works, then I am willing to try it.

I also agree that parents need to step up, however, NO offense intended, not everyone is educated well enough to help. Sometimes it may do more harm than good for a parent to help their child. That is not an excuse, but a fact. I know that my son is learning things in his 6th grade math class that I only learned in an elective math class, in high school (1980s). When I showed him the way I was taught, it is sometimes different from the way he was taught at school and he gets confused.


I do not believe that our schools are not able to teach the way kids were taught when we were younger because of class sizes, unruly students, funding, and lots of other reasons, but I think it has more to do with the ciriculum. We push our kids to learn but what is being taught only really scratches the surface. There is not enough time in the 6 and 1/2 hours a day, because there is so much MORE to learn.

Okay, I am off my band wagon now.

I would like to hear from users of the product. Results or no, I REALLY would like to hear your story.

answered by Misa | 03-27-2010 at 01:20 AM

I don't know a whole lot about Brainetics, only what I saw on the infomercial on tv today. As that was the first time I had seen it, I was impressed. I saw in some of the posts above, where you are waiting to get it until you hear more about it. I looked it up on the Brainetics web site. It sells for $149.99. After searching elsewhere, including E-bay for a lower price, I found it on a site called, Marbles the Brain Store for $99 + shipping. I sent a message to them to find out if it is the same thing as offered on TV. Apparently the price recently went up and when their supplies are gone at the lower price, they too will go up. My point is, if you are interested in getting it, get it there for $50 less.

HTH's

Janet

answered by Janet | 03-29-2010 at 11:09 PM

High price
It seems that those who are complaining about the price need a course in economics. Maybe someone can develop a course for teachers as it doesn't seem to have been taught anywhere. This way students can see how their newly learned math skills come into play in the real world. Price is equal to the intersection of Supply and Demand on a charted curve. When demand goes up, price goes up. When supply goes down, price goes up. The inverse of these are also true. Also, when teachers unions and tenure status demolish the curve students suffer. Let's get back to supply and demand in the teaching field! Before you teachers complain please learn some economics.

answered by Guest | 03-30-2010 at 11:26 AM

It is amazing to me that there are all the above posts, and NO ONE has actually tried the product! What a waste of time people!

answered by Guest | 03-30-2010 at 12:23 PM

Don't waste my time!!!
I agree with # 20.....please someone that has used the product post something about it!!! I am a teacher that would really like to know if this would help my struggling AND successful students in more areas than just Math.

answered by Guest | 04-03-2010 at 02:52 PM

This is the biggest scam anyone has ever seen. Put your children in school and they will be able to solve any of these problems. OR teach your children secret ways to solve certain problems and they will solve the random questions that come up. EVERY PROBLEM THEY SOLVE HAS A SECRET TO IT AND IS ONLY IF SOMEONE SAYS HOW TO SOLVE IT. THEY ARE NOT NORMAL MATH PROBLEM SOLVING QUESTIONS.

answered by Guest | 04-04-2010 at 09:48 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest View Post
Regarding quote 7-Your part of the problem. First of all, you don't need a college degree to help your child with math. Secondly, your child see's how your dealing with this problem, blaming the teacher. When you quit putting all of the responsibility on the teacher, perhaps your child will start stepping up to the plate. As a teacher myself, I'm tired of giving 200% and helping my students in every way that I can, going above and beyond, and yet am left to blame when a student doesn't perform. I use many strategies and this brainetics sounds like a nice supplement. A supplement is what it is. It doesn't replace working through concepts. That would be like having students memorize their math facts without teaching them the concepts. I teach concepts but it's also important for the students to be quick and efficient with their math facts for higher level learning to take place. Teaching them little tricks is very helpful. You can pay for Brainetics where some tricks are laid out or you can google math strategies, or mental math tricks etc. and come up with your own for free. Either way, it's worth your child's investment. Please, learn to work WITH your child's teacher, for your child's sake.
-----------
Sad how you're a teacher but yet you don't know how to properly use your vs. you're. Also, it's impossible to give 200%. Please, YOU'RE a fraud...Sincerely YOURS, Concerned Parent

answered by Guest | 04-04-2010 at 02:08 PM

Amazing
I have read several threads and most of the comments come from people who have not even tried it. I am a math teacher. Some of the current literature actually says not make students memorize multiplication tables. Not kidding - I am looking at one of the books with this garbage in it. Keep nitpicking incorrect grammar instead on contributing actual information. I think our Wii costs $250 but spending $200 on education is out of line. Wow.

answered by Guest | 04-05-2010 at 04:05 PM

WTF
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest View Post
I don't think it trains the steps of a math problem. It might teach via memory, but I don't think the course actually teaches to work through problems of higher math.
We can simply look at the following math problem and can easily figure it out without doing the steps, but it's more important to understand the steps taken to derive the answer.
1+X=3

You can easily see the answer X=2. If you don't know the steps to come up with the answer, how can anyone work through the more difficult math subjects.

Sure it's cute to do parlor tricks with math, squaring numbers and the like, but in reality, children need to be taught where the answer came from and how to work that out. Too many times are we wanting instant gratification for things. Our society has been built on the need to have the answer instantly, without understanding it. Without the deeper levels of thinking, and working down a problem, a society will never reach full potential.

I don't think it's a scam, but i don't think it fully works as advertised, either.
No one honestly looking for inside info cares about speculation or for that matter what you think the program does. Too many people come online like you and say what their opinion is on a subject without basing on facts. Your whole first paragraph says what you think it does, so therefore its obvious you didn't buy the project, and are wasting web page space with something that is helping none. The fact is you didn't buy the project, and your placing negative feelings towards a project that you have no idea about. I have always been a math wizard, and sitting down and listening to and perceiving the ways people think about math word problems or simply the math itself can seem all wrong. I was interested in this product because it seems to make people pay attention to only the details that matters when it comes to a math problem, the problem is efficiency and this system looks to actually change the way people perceive math problems, and that very perception could be the difference to someone solving the problem or getting flustered over the details.

answered by Guest | 04-06-2010 at 07:52 PM

The Program uses years old numbers theory, sometimes called number sense. Try doing a search of number sense and you can find every method that is used in this program(or at least most). It works great if the problems are set up using "math tricks". The 612 times 588 is easy (600 + 12) times (600 - 12). it's simple algebra (a-b)(a+b) gives (a2 - b2) so...... 600 squared minus 12 squared 360000-144 gives you 35956, but change either number by more than 1 and the "trick" no longer works.

answered by Guest | 04-07-2010 at 07:34 AM

Just the facts, please
Disclaimer: I am not a professional educator, although I am an educated person.

I saw the infomercial today. I am always skeptical of any infomercial’s claims, so I research the product before I buy. Unfortunately, there is little information available from independent sources on the Web regarding Brainetics. Most of the search results were from brainetics.com. The other results were mostly blog sites, mostly purporting to "review" Brainetics. I found no site that gave a valid, coherent, negative review of Brainetics. On the other hand, there were no academic peer reviews at all. That seems rather odd for a system that is supposed to be revolutionary.

Since there is no reliable positive or negative information on the Web, I checked two sites where I thought it likely that any complaints would be registered: the Better Business Bureau (bbc.org) and the Federal Trade Commission (ftc.gov). Both sites reported "no results found" for Brainetics. I also searched the Consumer Products Safety Commission (cpsc.gov) in the off chance any reports had been made there. The CPSC also returned no results.

In the case of true scams, there are normally hundreds of reports to the FTC and BBB. So I don't believe this is a financial scam. There remains the question about whether the system works as claimed. My conclusion is that, at this time, it is difficult to verify. If anyone knows of reliable, independent research, I'd like to see it posted here. If Brainetics truly works as claimed, $100 would be a bargain.

Off topic, but relevant:
While searching for "Brainetics Scam", I found that every single blog site I checked had "reviews" posted by people who showed a dismal command of the English language. No one reporting an alleged "scam" could make a coherent argument. In fact many of those could not even use coherent English! (Sadly, that includes this site.) People, English is our common language, but it is useless if we are all speaking (and writing) a different variant of the language. Very few have complete command of this language. That's understandable; it's a complex language that frequently breaks its own rules. Please, if you write a post, at least read it carefully before submitting it. Ask yourself, "could another English-speaking person understand the point I am trying to make"? After all, if your point is not clear, it is pointless to even make a point! It's also puzzling that there is such abysmal spelling in some of the blogs on this site. You Add It has built-in spell-checking, folks. When there is a squiggly red line under some words you type, it means you should STOP AND THINK! Ask yourself, did I use the correct word? A misspelled word often creates a different word with a totally different meaning than what you intend.

There is no communication if you cannot communicate clearly.

answered by Guest | 04-11-2010 at 02:09 PM

i bought the program to help "jump start" my daughter. she is very bright, but her school uses the everyday math program which unfortunately does not do enough drilling of facts. This was a way for her to see some "rules" to apply to solve the problems and give her some confidence so she can enjoy math - as of right now she does not. After a few days, she is having fun with it which is certainly worth 150 bucks to me.

answered by Guest | 04-11-2010 at 05:47 PM

mom of a gifted math child
I have an 8 year old son who is very gifted in math , I thought brainetics would be very beneficial to him because of how quick his brain works with numbers. He is having a lot of fun with this product. I've always been terrible in math and I'm even getting it .
He actually asks me if he can pop in the discs and learn new ways to figure out problems. I love it because he usually wants to play WII. I figure what the heck I'd rather him do brainetics than play video games.

answered by Guest | 04-11-2010 at 08:51 PM

A totally satisfied parent
When my daughter was in 3rd grade, we were lucky enough to have the creator of Brainetics come to her school. Brainetics was not created at that time, but Mr. Byster came to the school, and he totally engaged the kids and parents alike in learning. A little while later, I happened to see him on 20/20, so I kept my eye out for his system. I got the Brainetics system around two years ago, and I have to tell you all that we have used it, and we love it!! My daughter was always good in math and in school in general, (Straight A's actually, all through grade school). The summer before she was going into sixth grade, was when I got this system, and what it does is actually give your mind a workout. Yes, it teaches different ways to do lightning fast math and cool ways to memorize too. My daughter had fun with this, her confidence grew, and when they decided to test her for Gifted classes at the end of her sixth grade year, she aced the tests and is now thriving and blossoming in all gifted classes in seventh grade. I contribute the work out and the way that Brainetics trained her mind to retain information as the key element that took her from A's to WOWIE!

answered by Guest | 04-13-2010 at 07:30 PM

Brainetics is detrimental to a child's mathematical development. Sure, its nice to learn "tricks" to multiply squared values of numbers, and that might get them through elementary school and middle school (maybe), but once these children start going to high school and doing trigonometry, high-leveled algebra, and calculus, they will "crash and burn" simply because they do not understand why 25 x 25 equals 625 or why they got the answers they got when using brainetics.
Also, learning squared valued is nice, but realistically, squared values are hardly ever needed in real life.
Like someone above said, this is just an instant gratification product. I have no doubt that this product does what it says it does. Memorization techniques do work and I'm sure that anyone who uses this product will be able to multiply 945x945 within seconds, but when asked to find the derivative of x^5 or to find the sin(pi/2), they will expect a shortcut to be provided for them, and when it isn't, they will get frustrated, their self-esteem will go down, their grades will go down, and they will be tremendously behind all of the other students in their class who didn't use Brainetics.
An argument to this might be that anyone who isn't getting a degree in Mathematics, doesn't need to know derivatives, trigonometry or algebra. But, kids learn trigonometry, calculus, and algebra in high school. Algebra is required for graduation in most states. Also, for anyone who took Geometry, it is almost entirely proofs, or proving that what happens actually happens. A child who uses Brainetics without the proper background will not understand why math works, only that math works
Brainetics is nothing but a cheap trick that hinders the mind and prevents children from developing skills in critical thinking, which IS used everywhere, everyday, no matter what your lifestyle or career.

- Mathematician

answered by Guest | 04-17-2010 at 01:31 PM

Plain and Simple - The Answer isn't Everything. They teach that in school all the time in all subjects. That's why teachers make their students "Show Their Work".

Brainetics is about just getting the answer.

Also, to those of you asking for someone to try and the product and post their results. Every single post of someone who tried it will be that their child succeeded, because that's what it appears like initially. No one will truly see the effects of this product for several years, when these kids get to high school. Then we will all see that Brainetics is not the solution. It just like studying the long term effects of a new medication. We cant do it, because it hasn't existed long enough to study its long term effects. But, the foundation on which Brainetics is based is not conclusive for effective for the development of mathematical and critical thinking skills.

If you want your child to do better in math or school in general, turn off the TV, turn off the video games, sit down with your child and help them. Even if you aren't a math genius, you can help an elementary school child with their math homework. And if you don't understand it, find someone who does, like a tutor. Stop blaming the teacher, stop going for the "quick and easy fix", and do it yourself. Be proactive and legitimately help your child succeed.

Hard work is the solution, not Brainetics.

answered by Guest | 04-17-2010 at 01:43 PM

Parent
The previous post of "from A's to Wowie!", just sold me. I blew through freshman algebra in school and was done with my homework before class was over in the afternoon. I WAS BORED! So....I laid back and failed math because I began goofing off when I would normally be doing my homework in class and when I got home I could have cared less about homework and it didn't get done and I fell behind and I was tagged as dumb. As a side note I went into electronics and find the work engaging but quick math in my head, which the job requires, sometimes difficult. I have had trouble with wrote memory. I have trouble with focus. I have trouble with feeling competent and capable. I am ADD. If I had something like this when I was in grade school my mind would have been engaged, and I probably wouldn't have felt so on the outside of what other smart kids were learning and could do. Step by step repetition from the teachers I've read about in the previous posts is not the right thing for everyone every time. Not everyone is going on to be a math major. Enough said, math teachers frustrate me. I want to know how to do simple to medium difficulty math calculations quickly and easily so I can have less frustration and stress in my work day which I would think would translate into fewer "bad days". And as I think of it I could be a hero at work a bit more often. NICE!!! God bless anyone who can teach people like me. I'm 40 and exited about this program. I just saw the infomercial and it is selling for $14.95. 5 DVDs and some books and flashcards and things are included with the money back guarantee. I'm getting it.

answered by Guest | 04-17-2010 at 03:12 PM

Not a Scam
I have used the Brainetics program not only for myself but for my students It is a wonderful program if you actually take the time to learn and practice the system. For those people who say that it is a scam my guess is that they have never even tried to program. I don't know how you can call something a scam without actually giving the product a try. People often are looking for a quick fix and this is not that kind of system. I have read a few reviews from people who said that it didn't really work for them or their kids didn't show much interest. However if your children didn't show much interest it is because the parents didn't show much interest. If you state that the program didn't work then you didn't work the program. It teaches people to think outside of the box and it gives young students a renewed enthusiasm for math. The program has many practical math tricks as well as fun parlor type trick which the kids love!!! If this system has made math fun for even one person than he has done his job well!!

answered by Guest | 04-18-2010 at 04:53 AM

i wouldn't call it a scam, but that doesn't mean you should use it
Just a little note to those of you attacking the people voicing concern about the product when they haven't actually used it: When a significant number of comments are people saying something along the lines of "I understand math pretty well, and this seems fishy to me".. don't write them all off.

I'm 23, about to graduate with mechanical engineering and computer science degrees, and I've always been good at math, and... this seems fishy to me. I wouldn't say it's a scam, per se, but I would say that you probably shouldn't use this to *teach* math to your kids. It's probably fine as a supplement, once they can solve these types of problems with pencil and paper, to help them learn how to do them quickly in their head. But ONLY AFTER they understand the regular old foundations of how to do the problems.

The two explained examples I saw in the infomercial were how to multiply two 2-digit numbers that both start with 9, and how to multiply two numbers between 100 and 109. "The first number is always a 1, then add these 2 digits and put the answer here, then multiply these 2 digits and put the answer here." or something to that effect. All that is is a quick way to get the answer when multiplying two numbers between 100 and 109. That is NOT teaching your kid how to multiply two 3-digit numbers (which is obviously the more useful skill of the two.) If all the tricks are like that, there's no way there's enough of them to actually cover all the possible kinds of multiplications one would encounter. Or, if there are, then it'd be a whole lot of tricks to memorize, still without really learning how to actually multiply.

So, to summarize, as someone who hasn't used the program, but understands math (hell, I love math!), I'd stress that this should probably only be used as a supplemental aid, and not as an actual teaching tool. I admit I am intrigued by this product, (but mainly in the claims for helping memorization.) If I were a parent, I would probably buy it to check it out, but I would definitely watch it and work through it myself in it's entirety before I decided if I'd even let my kids see it.

answered by CollegeStudent | 04-19-2010 at 09:03 AM

If you want to spend a little less, check out the Scott Flansburg books first. These programs are not designed to be a base for higher math. They are simply designed to help with arithmetic calculations and are similar to learning the multiplication tables. Many kids are intimidated by numbers or just bored by it. If programs like these can get kids to look at arithmetic in another light and actually generate interest or reduce anxiety, then they are helpful. I don't think anyone is calling this thing a replacement for math education. It is merely a collection of tools.

answered by Slothar | 04-20-2010 at 10:34 AM

I just ordered the set of DVDs from Brainetics .com for $179.99 hoping that it will help my son who is now grade 11 to improve his appreciation for math. Not that he is Stupid because he is actually in the institute of science with an average grade of 96 overall. His overall performance with math in his elementary grade has always been his lowest grade and it followed through until now in his 11th grade. In his younger years I have even enrolled him in KUMON to accelerate his math skills, but it had not paid off, He actually hated going to his class. I took him off from it and just let him figure out things on his own from his school. There was a moment when he did well enough with a grade of 90 in grade 9, but this is because he was very inspired by his teacher who he claims was very nice and very good at teaching. Now...am still wondering if I can make any difference in his perception with NUMBERS because the BASIC is the FOUNDATION to the higher learning of MATH, CALCULUS, GEOMETRY, PHYSICS, TRIGONOMETRY and anything that has numbers including CHEMISTRY. As a parent I cannot equate any amount of money if it entails learning, just like any of you out there who value REAL LEARNING, we cannot just speculate, we cannot just sit down and guess...we can avail of their FREE-TRIAL...my son will soon be in college and this is my last HOPE...all I want is to give him something that will INSPIRE him to APPRECIATE NUMBERS and DEVELOP POSITIVE APPROACH towards it. I Know nothing is too late. After 30 days I will be in this site again to let you know if BRAINETICS had made a difference in my son's perception of NUMBERS.

answered by Guest | 04-20-2010 at 04:16 PM

Are you a parent or the seller
I wanted to make a post after the lat person and give you some advice. Never highlight your words in a quotation. Especially the way you did in your quote. You may be a concerned parent but my guess is that you are in sales because this is a subliminal tactic we use in sales to draw attention to our point so customers focus on value versus words. So I am completely disregarding your comments because of this.

I have not purchased the product but am beginning to think about purchasing it for my kids this summer as a part of a summer project. THERE IS NO REPLACING WORKING THROUGH THE EQUATION. See I capped my words to draw attention to them. This is critical so a child can validate their work and also forces them to work through the problem. I think that a child can learn from these other programs so as they advance it takes them less time to come to conclusions when they are in higher levels. If there is less stress in coming to a conclusion then a child will score better on tests no matter what the subject. I am willing to pay for less stress in my child's life. However a lot of these programs are scams, such as the speed reading and training your eyes to read faster. We tried it for the trial period and no ones scores improved but when we got them books they were interested in they were able to read much quicker. My son went through the Percy Jackson books in a few days. Okay off my soap box. Teach them to work the equations at a young age and they will excel in Math for life.

answered by Guest | 04-20-2010 at 07:21 PM

Teachers are stressing kids out
I have seen it with my own eyes....a child that loved school and then suddenly, have a teacher that times them (stress) and only goes over something once and expects them to understand it. i thought elementary school was for learning the basic skills...a foundation. If you rush that, the foundation isn't going to hold up. If they would make it fun...the children would learn...but they don't and they embarrass the kids who don't get it right away in front of other children. I home school because of one teacher who embarrassed my son and I wasn't going to stand by and have it done over and over again. I don't believe in homework......if they do the work in school, they shouldn't need homework. and , by the way, since I am a older parent, I was told NOT to help my son because the way they do math today is different than when I was in school. 10 +10 is still 20, correct?

answered by Guest | 04-20-2010 at 08:49 PM

I've read the first few posts at the top and I think the only way to know whether this program will adversely effect kids is to do a study. I would be very interested myself to learn how students who went thought the traditional program versus the brainetics program performed later in life. It would have to be a large scale study to be meaningful because no two students will follow the career path.

I would also be interested to see what benefits adults can take away from this program.

answered by Guest | 04-21-2010 at 07:35 AM

I just learned about this product, brainetics . How would this help dyslexia students? I am wondering because I am someone who is majoring in math ed. I have struggled with dyslexia all my life. Math has always been my strong point in learning.

answered by Guest | 04-22-2010 at 10:27 AM

Vedic Mathematics
There is a very interesting book titled, "Vedic Mathematics", written by Jagadguru Swami Sri and Bharati Krsna Tirthaji Maharaja, but don't worry, there's an English version, and it won't cost you $100 or $200 dollars. You can do a search on a search engine and find more information about this ancient system of math from India and examples of how it's done. I haven't tried Brainetics, like many of the commentators here, but when I saw the infomercial it reminded me of Vedic mathematics.

Now, if you want to learn the REAL reason why so many children struggle to learn in school (and many other alarming facts about school) read, "Weapons of Mass Instruction", by John Taylor Gatto. There are also several good articles by Gatto on the internet such as, "The Shocking Origins of Public Education", and at the bottom of the page there is a list of many of his other articles.

answered by Guest | 04-23-2010 at 10:47 AM

I purchased this product simply because I like to evaluate anything that will help my students
perform better. This is not it.

The product is simply arithmetic shortcuts and really does nothing to teach anyone how to
actually work through a problem and arrive at a solution.

Yes, It makes a third, fourth or fifth grader look brilliant, but as they advance in grades the flaws
in what this product "teaches" will become glaringly evident and a detriment to the student.

Do not waste your money or your child's time with this "snake oil"

answered by Math Teacher | 04-24-2010 at 06:19 AM

Buy a calculator, it's cheaper.

answered by Guest | 04-26-2010 at 08:15 AM

What if it comes naturally?
The reason this infomercial caught my attention was because I have a son that does something like this on his own; he tries to explain it to me but I cannot follow. This is similar to what this guy says of himself. If you listen to his (the author's) account of growing up, he realized he was a bit different in the way his mind worked. I find it amazing that he connected the dots and followed them to a system that he can communicate to others (which is a skill my son does not yet possess).
But does my son's lacking in communication ability sentence him to a life of status quo in the math realm? You can't effectively communicate how you got there so now you have to go back and rework all of this so I get it.?! And I am the one who has to start a fight with the kid because he doesn't work out his math problems on paper. So, I have to make it an argument of proving himself to the powers that be.
Furthermore, I went back to college in my 30's, since school was so remedial in my late teens I ruined my GPA (because I was bored by instruction that was so tedious). I KNOW I would have benefited from these shortcuts in learning algebra again. Today's algebra is nothing like yesterday's, it's way easier because it's more concise. Systems change, there is always a better way of doing everything. Others just have to catch on to the concept. Work smarter not harder.

There is nothing more disheartening than watching a young cashier use a calculator because I gave her a quarter after she rang in the amount of money paid. "Oh no, it went from a whole dollar amount to some type of crazy fraction, what do I do now?" Everyone can benefit from tricks like the multipliers of 9 by using your fingers. I still don't use it but they teach it to my children in public school classrooms.
A child can't do these shortcuts without understanding and using the basic facts. However, they can use a calculator without having a clue of how any of it works.
In second grade they are taught what multiplication is and how one could look it in a different way, such as 2+2+2+2 = 2 x 4. It's absurd to think anyone would suggest this is a replacement of fact based mathematics. Multiplication is a shortcut for addition and we ALL use it.
And by the way, if your child has been labeled, they will hand him a calculator in 6th grade because they assume he doesn't know his remedial math and needs the 'help'.
That is the GREAT injustice.
I will be investing. And the guy volunteers his time in Chicago schools, if he makes a little bit of cash on the DVD's-it is as it should be.

answered by A "different" kids mom | 04-26-2010 at 06:36 PM

How can we expect our children to "do math?"
I wish those of you who are liberal were this skeptical of the "Obamacare" math while the legislation was being debated for 9 months. For the sake of saving $99 to $204 you will argue over a single infomercial to show how smart you are, but you cannot take the time to put 2 and 2 together to realize what you will lose in taxes and freedoms due to a hasty and flawed "reform". The sad thing is that no matter how well our children perform at math, it will likely take years before this mess will be undone. The situation will be similar to what is happening in all of these states that have pension programs providing over a million dollars of benefits for less than $200k "paid in" by the employee. If you cannot figure that math out, what hope do you have of teaching your children?

answered by Count Me Conservative | 05-01-2010 at 04:14 AM

get out of here...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest View Post
-----------
Sad how you're a teacher but yet you don't know how to properly use your vs. you're. Also, it's impossible to give 200%. Please, YOU'RE a fraud...Sincerely YOURS, Concerned Parent
puh-friggin-lease.. it's called a typo.. the commenter used 'your' correctly in SEVERAL other places.. you're an idiot..

answered by Guest | 05-03-2010 at 07:29 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Count Me Conservative View Post
I wish those of you who are liberal were this skeptical of the "Obamacare" math while the legislation was being debated for 9 months. For the sake of saving $99 to $204 you will argue over a single infomercial to show how smart you are, but you cannot take the time to put 2 and 2 together to realize what you will lose in taxes and freedoms due to a hasty and flawed "reform". The sad thing is that no matter how well our children perform at math, it will likely take years before this mess will be undone. The situation will be similar to what is happening in all of these states that have pension programs providing over a million dollars of benefits for less than $200k "paid in" by the employee. If you cannot figure that math out, what hope do you have of teaching your children?
you're hilarious.. sorry we can't all have Glenn Beck Special Edition Calculators that deal in unsubstantiated claims, talking points, and irrational fear..

answered by Guest | 05-03-2010 at 07:33 AM

Here's a link to the first review I found when I did a search for reviews on this product:

http://viewsfromthepants.blogspot.com/2008/03/brainetics-can-make-you-smarter-and-fun.html

He's neither outrageously praising the product, nor is he slamming it before giving it a chance. I saw this as a genuine review by a father with whom I could relate. And he has provided more details and info than any of you have provided here. He reviews each DVD individually, stating what each one contains and how well he and each of his two children (aged 9 and 11) learned from it.

Also, the infomercial that I saw on TV listed the 5-DVD set (with books, etc) for $14.95. While reading these comments I thought "Maybe I saw that wrong," but then one of these later posts said $14.95 as well. I wonder why the change? *shrug*

answered by Guest | 05-05-2010 at 10:11 AM

Get a Grip!
Some of you teachers need to get a freaking grip! If a parent doesn't have a good experience with a teacher it doesn't mean they hate YOU. There are teachers that just plain don't do a good job and teachers that would sacrifice their lives for every child. Don't blast the parent if they say they are having a bad experience with a teacher. Good grief!

answered by Guest | 05-07-2010 at 12:11 PM

Brainetics???
Hi everyone,
I have a passion for children's education. I would like to reply to those of you who bring up about the teachers in our schools and their responsibility to teach our children under their care. First of all, these children are not their children; they did not have these children. I know I am going to make a lot of parents mad or upset but please hear me out. I have made my share of mistakes in raising my children so remember this as you read this. What I am about to say comes after pretty much after my kids turned 18. 1. We, as parents, put too much responsibility on other people taking care of our children. We expect the teachers to do all the teaching, we take them to someone to teach sports, to someone else to do music, to school where they have many teachers.
And heaven forbid, if the teacher makes a mistake! I homeschooled my two children and tried to tutor other children. One father walked up to his son while I am tutoring him and smacked him across the face. Another mother never looked at her children's schoolwork. I was tutoring them for free and she had no idea what they were doing. You do not need to have a college degree to teach.
I had not done Algebra for over 25 years but I taught myself then taught my children and then other people's kids because they were just too busy making money in order live in this huge house, have fancy phones for everyone, TV's in everyone's bedroom, expensive cars, going out to eat all the time, these lessons and those lessons, and the kids had no idea how to make a bed, wash dishes, wash cars that they were chauffeured around in, did not mow the lawn; they paid for people to clean the house and mow, Well, gee, they did not have time to cook or teach their children to cook. So...
who was going to teach the kids the practical things in life? My point is this, who had these kids in the first place? and if you are not interested in your children do not expect others to be either. Do not expect people to do for your kids what you are not willing to do. Sure, they are being paid to teach, but these kids are not their ultimate responsibility. I am sorry ladies, but I lived in a 900 sq. ft. house, used cloth diapers, made my own baby food, did my own cooking,
taught my children practical skills; my son knows how to do brakes on a car, my kids fixed up our house, spent $1700 but did all the work ourselves, plumbing, electrical, refacing cabinets, installing dishwasher, sink, faucet, vanity, ceiling fans, new outlets, painting, ceramic tile in kitchen and foyer. House went from $118,000 to $132,000. Oh, and we also built our own swing set and slide. All from scratch. They know how to clean, bake, cook, laundry, we had a small garden, and we lived inside city limits. We had other people's children at our house and these kids spent a lot of time on the phone, at the mall, talking about boyfriends and girlfriends,
4 year olds walking alone to may house. Parents, please make sure that you spend more time with your children teaching them than your hired teacher does. Thank you!!

answered by donnamusic | 05-08-2010 at 05:00 PM

wow
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest View Post
I don't think it trains the steps of a math problem. It might teach via memory, but I don't think the course actually teaches to work through problems of higher math.
We can simply look at the following math problem and can easily figure it out without doing the steps, but it's more important to understand the steps taken to derive the answer.
1+X=3

You can easily see the answer X=2. If you don't know the steps to come up with the answer, how can anyone work through the more difficult math subjects.

Sure it's cute to do parlor tricks with math, squaring numbers and the like, but in reality, children need to be taught where the answer came from and how to work that out. Too many times are we wanting instant gratification for things. Our society has been built on the need to have the answer instantly, without understanding it. Without the deeper levels of thinking, and working down a problem, a society will never reach full potential.

I don't think it's a scam, but i don't think it fully works as advertised, either.

I'm just putting it out there but if you learn how to do fast math you can virtually do all math problems in a snap....for instance finding the circumference of a circle you take the diameter of the circle times pi (3.14) so that is just about going to get a 2nd grader into the higher math class!

answered by Guest | 05-09-2010 at 06:29 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest View Post
Here's a link to the first review I found when I did a search for reviews on this product:

http://viewsfromthepants.blogspot.com/2008/03/brainetics-can-make-you-smarter-and-fun.html

He's neither outrageously praising the product, nor is he slamming it before giving it a chance. I saw this as a genuine review by a father with whom I could relate. And he has provided more details and info than any of you have provided here. He reviews each DVD individually, stating what each one contains and how well he and each of his two children (aged 9 and 11) learned from it.

Also, the infomercial that I saw on TV listed the 5-DVD set (with books, etc) for $14.95. While reading these comments I thought "Maybe I saw that wrong," but then one of these later posts said $14.95 as well. I wonder why the change? *shrug*
It's $14.95 for the free trial, then 1 payment of $149.99. If you go the Brainetics website it gives the details. So you're actually paying $14.95 for the "free trial" and the product is $149.99, or you can just purchase the product outright for $149.99.

I'm considering this product as a summer math program for my kids while school is out. I'll see what the wife thinks about it all before we decide, but I'm leaning towards buying it. It doesn't seem to be a great product for teaching math, but as a way to keep my kids involved and using their brains while they're out of school on summer break, I see it as a decent option.

answered by Guest | 05-10-2010 at 09:19 AM

We will buy video games at the drop of a hat, but we nitpick over an educational program? Come on....

answered by Guest | 05-11-2010 at 01:21 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest View Post
Brainetics is detrimental to a child's mathematical development. Sure, its nice to learn "tricks" to multiply squared values of numbers, and that might get them through elementary school and middle school (maybe), but once these children start going to high school and doing trigonometry, high-leveled algebra, and calculus, they will "crash and burn" simply because they do not understand why 25 x 25 equals 625 or why they got the answers they got when using brainetics.
Also, learning squared valued is nice, but realistically, squared values are hardly ever needed in real life.
Like someone above said, this is just an instant gratification product. I have no doubt that this product does what it says it does. Memorization techniques do work and I'm sure that anyone who uses this product will be able to multiply 945x945 within seconds, but when asked to find the derivative of x^5 or to find the sin(pi/2), they will expect a shortcut to be provided for them, and when it isn't, they will get frustrated, their self-esteem will go down, their grades will go down, and they will be tremendously behind all of the other students in their class who didn't use Brainetics.
An argument to this might be that anyone who isn't getting a degree in Mathematics, doesn't need to know derivatives, trigonometry or algebra. But, kids learn trigonometry, calculus, and algebra in high school. Algebra is required for graduation in most states. Also, for anyone who took Geometry, it is almost entirely proofs, or proving that what happens actually happens. A child who uses Brainetics without the proper background will not understand why math works, only that math works
Brainetics is nothing but a cheap trick that hinders the mind and prevents children from developing skills in critical thinking, which IS used everywhere, everyday, no matter what your lifestyle or career.

- Mathematician
You my friend are ignorant. You say that you are a mathematician and then slam math tricks that get you to an answer faster. I just graduated last weekend with a degree in computer science so I have taken just about every high level math class. You use a derivative as an example so let me ask you a question.... When you do the derivative of x5 do you use the actual definition of a derivative to find the answer? No.... Of course you don't because it takes a whole page to write out. Every calculus book in the world shows you how to do a so called "trick" to find derivatives and integrals quickly and easily. This system is no different. I have read up on some of these methods and I will use them from now on because they are faster. Things like this program will help your kid with completing the math portion of the ACT or SAT which is timed and is the most important test in your kids life when it comes to college. Listen people take it from me as a kid who knows math better than anyone posting on here. Buy this and teach it to your kid, you will not regret it. Also don't listen to all the retard parents who have agendas against teachers and what not. They are just jealous that your kid can multiply 3 digit numbers faster than they can and your kid will go to college while they are stuck being a secretary making less than 15k a year.

answered by Guest | 05-11-2010 at 10:35 AM

Going to try it as an adult
I am 26 years old and can remember not understanding math back in middle school. I will not blame the teachers, because I do have the basic understanding of math, but I do vividly remember being afraid to ask questions out of fear of embarrassment (I was the kid that asked A LOT of questions and was made fun of for it). Then I just began to hate math because of the aforementioned reasons, leading to further problems in learning it, due to disinterest. I know I have an issue with attention span, so if this program will hold my attention and teach me something at the same time, I am going for it. Again, this is from the perspective of being a horrible math student as a child, and now understanding my own learning problems as an adult. I plan to buy this and use it during my off time while deployed to Afghanistan. Hopefully I will remember this website and be able to give results from a non-math ace, adults point of view.

answered by Guest | 05-12-2010 at 01:39 PM

brainetics
I bought this.

in DVD they just show how to square in 40s, square in 50s, square two digit with the ones is 5, multiply in 90s, square from 101-125, square from 475-525. But not have any samples for square in 60s, 70s, 80s...etc

for divide, the show only divide by 91 and 143 ( example: 61/91 or 71/143 ) and never show any other number such as: 33/78..etc..

for the trick is OK. For children to learn I think this is not enough.... I am not sure if I show my child about this DVD...

answered by Guest | 05-13-2010 at 02:22 AM

GET IT QUICKLY
What does it do? It boosts confidence! When a child just learns their times tables, they are amazed when they can quickly and easily, in their head, multiply 25x 25 or 35 x 35 - it is a hoot to see their faces light up. Confidence breeds the 'fun' factor which is what we all try to teach (Parents and teachers) our kids. It can be fun to learn - this system proves that. It also teaches them to think on more than one level which helps in more areas than math!

As far as teachers vs parents: It is a joint effort. If your child's teacher is not responsive, move up the chain to the principal or even the superintendent...

ALL CHILDREN ARE ENTITLED TO AN EDUCATION REGARDLESS OF THEIR ABILITY, it is a parent and teacher's joint venture to make sure they get it.

answered by Guest | 05-15-2010 at 11:27 PM

Look, if addition, and multiplication can be virtually instantaneous
It looks like these processes save time, we all know that taking TIMED Tests requires being able to save time in area's of strength so that more time may be spent in area's of weakness, and if this program can virtually eliminate longhand addition, and multiplication, and wherever else the program teaches, then there are huge time savings via these processes. Who can remember thinking they would have liked to have MORE time in a certain area part of a test? If, this teaches techniques that can be used for a lifetime, (I am 50 and still use addition AND multiplication) then $150-$200 is not too high to pay.

answered by Zach | 05-17-2010 at 12:02 PM

go to qvc.com, it's $92.88 + $7.97 s/h
I'm looking at this for myself because despite having been great in math - up through Diff E Q, now all I do is add and subtract my checkbook. I hope this does work.

answered by Guest | 05-18-2010 at 03:14 AM

Most of the posts that I have read that claim positive results with Brainetics, have mentioned that their children are very bright or gifted or great in math. These reviews don't really mean much to me because these gifted children would have succeeded even without the program. Their scores would have been good without the program.

I'm reminded of a teacher that said "I'm gifted in teaching gifted children." What a joke.... gifted children are going to learn. A game or program that helps gifted children learn their math easier seems like a joke. The true test of this product would be when an average child or child with learning difficulties is helped by the program. Many children who just don't get math or sometimes just get by, usually have some underlying processing issues. There are many average children who have trouble with mentally going backwards by 10 from a number as simple a 200.

I would like to know if this product helps average children. If it truly helps average children then it would probably be worth the money.

answered by 4 boys and a girls mom | 05-18-2010 at 04:45 PM

The problem today is a vast majority of the populace has become lazy, this program will work, and so will any other program out there that gets people to continue their education beyond the classroom. The problem can't be blamed on video games, or television. it rests solely with the parents to make sure their children put forth their best effort to do what they can to be all they can be. But now, instead of school being school to most parents, its nothing more then a daycare for the day.

Same with after school programs like sports or what not, parents drop their kids off at practice or games, and pick them up in a few hours when really they should be staying and being a part of that with their kids. Look around next time your at a school function or sports game, the stands should have at least double the amount of children playing.

I understand that some parents have jobs that require long hours, and not much you can do when you need to put food on the table, But I do see that in the past 20 or 30 years, people have just become less involved.

And that's why I feel programs like this are great, its brings the family around the table together, and thinking about things they wouldn't have thought about before as a Team. If you buy this program and slap it in the dvd for your children, and go do something else, your totally missing the point.

Another thing I want to address is the fact that children are expensive, if spending $150 dollars to help your children learn is going to make you break the bank, chances are you shouldn't have had children in the first place.

Just my 2 cents.

answered by Guest | 05-20-2010 at 12:20 AM

Excercises the brain
What intrigues me about this program is not that it "teaches math". In fact, I don't think it claims to do that, but that it trains the brain to visually memorize. My son has trouble memorizing anything that you can't easily put a picture to, like numbers and spelling words. He is a right brained learner, and they usually memorize in pictures. This program claims to teach you how to use both sides of your brain, which I think would be helpful to him. I'm not sure what practical purpose there is to learning how to put the letters of a word in alphabetical order, as shown on the video, but it does a great deal of "training" the brain to see things in the "mind's eye". This is where visual memory comes into play, and I think this would be very beneficial for a child like mine who needs to "see" things in order to remember them.

answered by Guest | 05-20-2010 at 02:47 PM

it may be new to you..
This system is based on the concepts of vedic mathematics (look it up). Vedic mathematics is a 3 thousand year old system for arithmetic that is used extensively in India and Asia. It is by no means a "parlor trick" and that insult is lazy at best. The methods of teaching arithmetic in American schools is not the "correct" way, but the method familiar to most people in the U.S. (the reason that different techniques are taught is due mainly to religion and the politics of the past and almost not at all because of math "correctness") For most simple arithmetic problems, vedic mathematics is faster and more accurate, and the process is less cumbersome. For the comments about students not learning the theory behind math and not having success at higher levels that is absurd. Higher level math theory has nothing to do with solving simple arithmetic, and learning vedic methods doesn't involve forgetting the general concepts. Let's look at two examples to get some idea of the differences:

A) familiar way in the U.S. B) different way used in other places

104 104
106x 106x
------ -----
624 1 : bring down the 1
0000 10 : 6 + 4 = 10
10400+ 24 : 6 x 4 = 24
-------- -----
11024 11024


One way you can learn to do so in your head and the other you most likely cannot. There are many different but similar techniques to do most all arithmetic faster and easier that work for almost any type of problem with any kind of numbers, including multiplication, division, squaring, cubing, square roots, cube roots and much more. True, it is something new to learn and takes practice, but can be learned fast and the payoff is immensely better.

There is a reason that children in India and Asia crush American students on standardized math tests, as the vedic techniques are used taught almost exclusively. In my graduating class in engineering school (at a prestigious American university), almost two-thirds of the graduating students were from southeast Asia! Most of my fellow students were amazed when I didn't know these processes and almost laughed when i showed them the way I was taught in American school.

With all that being said, the techniques can be found on the internet free of charge to a great extent so I don't know if there is a reason to purchase any program. Brainetics invented nothing new except the presentation of the material. I implore you, check out the youtube channel for glad2teach, he will show you a number of these techniques free of charge. Many other references are available for free also.

answered by m.b. | 05-21-2010 at 10:50 PM

There's nothing wrong with these tricks that this system teaches. This is how they should teach arithmetic in school. The normal way they teach kids to do long division and multiplication don't really teach kids about the fundamentals behind these operations. They are just the "old tricks." These new tricks are just faster. There really isn't anything "conceptual" about multiplying, dividing, adding, and subtracting anyway. I agree that this tricks don't translate into higher math. That being said...they are what they are...and kids that didn't know these things would have to use a calculator anyway. It sucks that some people are on here talking about "immediate gratification" and how this product is endorsing that. It's really the education system in this country that promotes this whole "immediate gratification." I'm a math major and the way I've been taught math throughout school is to just get the gist of what's going on. They want you to speed through the work. You don't really get a deep understanding of the material even if you make A's in your classes. Our education system is a joke and that's why most people hate school. Learning is fun if you can go at your own speed. But I don't have a choice but to conform to the way school is in order to get a job. Really going to a university doesn't really help you financially all that much. There are so many ways to make money other than the "normal route." There's really only a few jobs that you can actually get with a bachelor's where you can make money. Big Universities are basically ripping people off for the most part. Unless you do Engineering, Nursing, Med School, phd program, or Actuarial Science (what I'm doing), then you're not going make any money. Most majors at universities are a waste of effort, time, and money. If I wasn't going to be an Actuary, then I'd go to a Tech school. They are much better for getting a job. Being an entrepreneur is really the best way to go. Tons of people who are extraordinarily rich never graduated high school. People are brainwashed into thinking that they have to be these outstanding students in school and have to graduate from the "Ivy League" to make money. That couldn't be further from the truth. Sorry about the rant and the bad spelling/grammar.

answered by Andy | 05-25-2010 at 11:47 AM

Amazed
First of all, isn't the proper education of our children the very basis of our existence? Aren't our children the future of mankind? If so, then why don't educated people come up with ways to teach children the very best way of learning, for free? Why should any of us have to 'pay' for something that will help to better mankind overall? Doesn't that just prove the petty, greedy nature of mankind as a whole? If a system of learning is better than all others, then why on earth aren't such systems used as common practice, for free, in ALL educational institutions? Education, no matter its source, should not be a product. It should be a necessity that is freely available to anyone. Take for instance higher learning. Only the wealthy can have a higher education? Greed. Students have to work their butts off while in college. Where is the time for learning, when they have to struggle with a full time job as well as their full time education? What is more important here? No wonder generation after generation is becoming more and more ignorant. Our basic mindset is not on the betterment of mankind, but on how much money we can put in our pockets. Shame on humanity!

All schools, no matter the level of education involved, should be free, meaning paid for by the entire population of mankind. Housing, food, clothing, educational supplies. All should be inclusive. But, as is typical of mankind throughout all of history, almighty money is more important than humanity improving itself generation after generation.

Most of these posts really sicken me. Not all children are capable of learning the same material, using the same methods. It is a known fact that not everyone learns everything the same way. Each of us has our brains wired differently. Nobody pays any attention to this simple fact. They just cram everyone into one mold and expect identical clones to exit from this mold. That is not a reality.

If money was left out of the educational equation, then there would be no scams. There would be no 'one size fits all' mentality. There would be only superior learning systems, aimed at making mankind and our world in general a better place overall. After over ten thousand years, you would think that mankind would have learned this very basic idea by now. But as usual, greed comes before reason. What does this say about humanity?

I am an engineer. I didn't have to work hard to become one. My brain is just wired this way. I designed and built my first laser in the fifth grade. But that is me. Not everyone can do this. As I said, not everyone is wired the same way. My parents or teachers had absolutely nothing to do with my drive to become an engineer or my skills as a pre-teen. Engineers are not made in schools, they are born. This is a fact with all people of all skills. They are not created in schools, they are born wired to be that way. An education simply 'refines' what they already are.

This concept that 'if you try hard enough, you can become anything you want to be' is simply a lie told to children to make them feel better about themselves. It is not based in anything even remotely resembling reality. I have seen children brought to tears because they couldn't understand basic math. Other children on the other hand, pick up basic math as easily as speaking. Now tell me that both groups of children will excel in math on the same level, if only the first group tried harder. They won't.

People need to identify certain traits in children and structure their education along those lines. It is the only way to eliminate the 'mold' of education that presently exists. This mold exists, out of sheer stupidity, which doesn't say much about our educational system either.

In conclusion, if anyone, anywhere has developed a means to better society as a whole, it should be offered as an act of decency and given to society freely, not as an act of greed.

answered by Guest | 05-28-2010 at 04:34 AM

Jump the gun
Everyone is jumping way ahead of themselves. NOBODY has yet replied after actually using the brainetics program. WHAT!!?? That is unbelievable. I haven't used it yet but everyone can agree that if it make a "game" out of math then it will make it more fun to do in school. THAT will make the children learn more about the math they are currently learning. And YES I use capital letters for a heightened expression of thought.

answered by Guest | 05-29-2010 at 04:40 PM

Teacher Unions
There's always some Libertarian clown like #19 who uses any opportunity to bash teachers and unions. It's been my experience in life that people who act like they know the absolute truth about things--and that you don't--inevitably know the least and are simply the most insecure. If they really knew more, they'd be enlightening us rather than wasting lines telling you you know nothing about economics.

Unionization can't "demolish" the price/supply/demand curve, it merely alters it; of course it still works as perfectly as it did before. Why not just use the word "enhances" or "improves"? How about, while we're just picking things out of the air, unionization makes the curve more efficient? There's nothing wrong with people freely associating in a free market, and it's not teachers' fault other industries don't unionize.

Unionization can make an economy more efficient, balanced, and robust. Lack of unionization elsewhere, say overseas for a real-world example, is why jobs find their way to exploit slave labor--that's a race-to-the-bottom for working people, which goes a long way towards explaining what's happened here in the U.S. over the last 30 years.

answered by www.christianecon.com | 05-30-2010 at 07:50 PM

Talk What You KNOW
WOW! I've this is the 3rd site I've browsed trying to find someone that has actual experience with the product, only to find through all of the commentary, NO ONE has actually bought the system AND used it! There was even a post on another site by a person who had (supposedly) "just unpacked" the product but posted a 3 paragraph explanation why the system was a waste of money (money that his/her parents spent on the system for grandkids). Well, I guess it helps to have extrasensory powers and the ability to look at a product and determine if it will work or not.

Talk what you KNOW! Comments without experience aren't helping anyone searching for practical information.

answered by Guest | 05-31-2010 at 09:29 AM

You know I rarely leave comments on threads, simply because of the same reasons I see on this thread. I am an adult with ADD, and have had problems with my short term memory my whole life. I came on to this review thread to see if this program would be helpful in this regard. I agree that it would be best if your child has already mastered their basic math skills. I agree that parents should take as much time as possible helping their children with their studies. I also realize, just like most Americans, we have two working parents and more than one child. We cannot judge or blame anyone for not having the perfect scenario going on at home. Most parents (if there are even two in the same house) are spending most of their time just getting food on their kids plates. I know that when I went to school, my teachers were totally uninterested in the fact that I could not comprehend math, and stuck me in the "special" class. Now Im not a genius, but my IQ isn't at a hundred either. Teachers are over burdened with large classes, and parents are over burdened with life in general. It seems to me, that we all could have skipped the finger pointing and judgment calls on other reviewers, and spent more time trying to figure out how to help the children. Come on now, cant we all just work together instead of talking down to each other? I just came on to see if it would help me, as I will be opening a restaurant and need to get my ADD under control with out the use of drugs. All these mean and ridiculous comments, make trying to hear real reviews very frustrating. I thank the reviewers who actually used the product, and gave valued information. It would just have been nice to not have to weed through all the other meaningless comments.

answered by Guest | 06-01-2010 at 06:27 PM

There HAVE been responses from people that have used the product. This is a long list, you just have to read the messages to find them.
Try #28, 29, 30, 43 and 57. It seems to be getting mixed reviews.

As for those that are making comments about teachers/schools, (coming from a homeschooling mom) I do see a lot of parents that drop kids off at school for the 'freedom'. (think about all the parents that get excited when their child turns 6 in august???) But, if you live in those states that are SO obsessed with these ***^^ tests!!! (i really tried to think of a nice word...) many teachers, including the ones in my area, will tell parents DO NOT TEACH THE KIDS. We will do it wrong, and it has to be 'perfect' for the test. It has to be exactly the same way as the teacher. They will get upset if you do teach your own child 'your way'. You will get a note sent home. The tests bring money to the school, plain and simple. You help your child, teach them in a way that is easier for him/her to understand-but contradicts the teachers, put simply 'you're taking their money'.
They don't take kindly to that.

answered by Guest | 06-03-2010 at 11:30 AM

Seems ok to me...
I found this thread looking for insight on Brainetics after seeing the infomercial the other day. Since there is no scam in evidence, I will probably get this for my grandchildren, aged 7 and 14. The point is well made that math is a process, not parlor games. Still, if it makes math seem fun and generates enthusiasm for learning, it's priceless. My wife and I will ensure that the process is not neglected while hoping this product will infuse a bit of a thrill into the learning environment. I would add that math is also about relationships between values. Discovering those relationships (whether by process or by rote) is IMHO inherently worthwhile for the student in the long term, even if much more work will be required before they sit for their SATs. We all want our children and grandchildren to get good grades. Beyond that--maybe somewhat in lieu of that--I want my two grandchildren to love learning for its own sake.

answered by Marc-GA | 06-03-2010 at 03:29 PM

not something new, it’s the packaging
These tips and “tricks” are not new, it’s the packaging. There are books out there that show basically the same thing, but most education is learned with a visual aspect entwined with the information being taught.
So… do you get a book on this subject and read it, how many children would enjoy that? But when you get something that is interactive, children learn more (and faster).

Why is it that people can remember the lyrics to songs but can’t remember steps to math solutions? Because songs are entertaining and enjoyable (unless you get a stupid song stuck in your head... all day), on the other hand, math can be frustrating, this program makes it entertaining (or tries to, depending what you think is entertaining)

Anyways, if the program helps people learn, great. But remember, there is no “one sizes fits all” method on teaching/learning any subject, to a certain degree, everyone learns differently. So if this program doesn’t work for you, there may be a program out there that will.

answered by Terry G | 06-05-2010 at 11:08 AM

there is nothing out there that is easy.....especially when you have dyslexia!

answered by Guest | 06-06-2010 at 02:28 PM

Help for your child
Parents, you are forgetting that YOU are your child's first teacher. Stop blaming the teachers. And why is it that YOU can't help your child with basic (elementary school) math? Teachers deal with too many children in the class, too many behavior problems, too many children who don't do their homework and too many children being socially promoted. You parents kill me. You spend thousands of dollars on electronic games, dirt bikes, sneakers, sports, iPods, etc. But won't invest in a tutor or an educational program like Brainetics.

Parents, you're the problem, not Brainetics and certainly not the teachers. We (who are math teachers) are faced with students saying "math is boring". We need something that will catch and hold their attention in this electronic age. I'm going to buy Brainetics.

Signed: This is for the children

answered by Guest | 06-08-2010 at 02:13 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest View Post
Parents, you are forgetting that YOU are your child's first teacher. Stop blaming the teachers. And why is it that YOU can't help your child with basic (elementary school) math? Teachers deal with too many children in the class, too many behavior problems, too many children who don't do their homework and too many children being socially promoted. You parents kill me. You spend thousands of dollars on electronic games, dirt bikes, sneakers, sports, iPods, etc. But won't invest in a tutor or an educational program like Brainetics.

Parents, you're the problem, not Brainetics and certainly not the teachers. We (who are math teachers) are faced with students saying "math is boring". We need something that will catch and hold their attention in this electronic age. I'm going to buy Brainetics.

Signed: This is for the children

I don't buy a dirt bike and rent a bicycle for when the bike doesn't work. I don't buy two pairs of sneakers, so why should I have to pay someone else (tutors) to do what teachers are already getting paid to do. I pay thousands of dollars in taxes so I'm not going to spend even more money to get something that for which I've already paid. Teachers complaining that teaching is the parents job is just disgusting.

Yes, teaching has challenges. If you can't meet those challenges and still successfully teach the children: Find a new profession. Get in the real world. Like everyone else, you have a mission and challenges, if you can't overcome the challenges you should be fired like everyone else in the real world.

Signed: For people not looking for excuses.

answered by Guest | 06-10-2010 at 02:01 PM

Of course it shows process
Just because the students are learning to do it in their heads does NOT mean they are not learning concepts. In fact, they need to know concepts and exercise their brain in order to get the answer quickly. It is a great product that teaches a great method for all levels of math. first grade through calculus will benefit from these methods.

answered by Guest | 06-13-2010 at 08:53 PM

brainetics comes to australia
I'm guessing these posts are all from the USA,While watching TV i came across the infomercial for brainetics, and was amazed at the skill in which these kids could come up with the answer so quickly, as my daughter suffers from maths i thought this would benefit here so watched on with enthusiasm, i was sold but weary as the price advertised was only $19.95, i thought a bit cheap for such a product when usually others like this are dearer. So hence I'm here on the net to find out more and after reading these comments which all made good and valid points, especially the ones that state this is just a easy way to get the answer and not do the working out part, and also only lists certain number sequences, i will not get this product. I will instead try to help my daughter as best i can, we did have a tutor for 2 yrs but got a little expensive.

So to all who posted here thanks for your posts they all helped

Darren
Australia

answered by Guest | 06-13-2010 at 11:06 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest View Post
Parents, you are forgetting that YOU are your child's first teacher. Stop blaming the teachers. And why is it that YOU can't help your child with basic (elementary school) math? Teachers deal with too many children in the class, too many behavior problems, too many children who don't do their homework and too many children being socially promoted. You parents kill me. You spend thousands of dollars on electronic games, dirt bikes, sneakers, sports, iPods, etc. But won't invest in a tutor or an educational program like Brainetics.

Parents, you're the problem, not Brainetics and certainly not the teachers. We (who are math teachers) are faced with students saying "math is boring". We need something that will catch and hold their attention in this electronic age. I'm going to buy Brainetics.

Signed: This is for the children
I had to respond to a small part of your post. Where you mention "math is boring". I started to feel this way as well. And several years after graduating from High School, I found out why I didn't enjoy math as much as I could have (oh, and I really enjoy it a lot!). It is because I was never given some kind of concrete example as to the usage for a lot of the math that I was required to do.
For example, the old "a^2 + b^2 = c^2", was never explained as to it's real usage. yes, it's calculation of the long side of a right triangle, but none of my teachers explained it by using real life examples.
I also learned matrix math in college, but didn't fully understand it's purpose in life. Now, 25+ years later I've begun to understand how useful and effective it is in my daily job.

answered by Chris C | 06-14-2010 at 03:13 AM

alternate options
Hi I stopped reading the reviews after a while. I saw this commercial today and thought I would look up what people have said. I then did a search for one of the skills and found them all on a site called vedic maths, as another poster mentions.

I am a maths teacher and I will show my students quick methods here and there but only once they have learned the concept. I remember being taught the timesing anything by 11 shortcut in grade 11. I don't think it's a scam, just a repackaging of an old methodology. You need to be able to do the basic operations to put the number together. If he's changing kids opinions on maths that's a big thanks.

Consider one of the most disliked areas - algebra. One of the biggest things that always spins a student out is when they are in year 9 and saying they are bad at algebra, and when I tell them they've been doing it since grade 1 their whole outlook changes. ie. 5 + a box = 7, what goes in the box? 2, well that's algebra, we just replace the box with a letter and do more advanced questions. WOAW.

I have no affiliation to either of the sites I am about to mention, I recommend them to parents as parents have recommended them to me. I'm also a tutor so tell people to try this before going the expensive path of one-one tutoring.

www.mathsonline.com.au - free - lecture style presentation of concepts, kinda dry, kids I have introduced it to haven't used it much
www.mathletics.com.au - $100/year - a lot of schools use this as a practice of the concepts, they get to compete against other students around the world, and 'win' points to upgrade how their screen looks. It's interactive, if a school has signed up then it's usually $20/student and the kids can use it at home also.

Have a good opinion of maths, and that it's important in everyday life and that's a step in the right direction for creating a positive attitude towards maths.

answered by Guest | 06-14-2010 at 04:03 AM

this is too funny
Hi

what people write here as parents just amazes me.
I teach at college level and the performance of students here is in my opinion a serious
concern. No wonder that the USA is falling behind.

It also amazes me how non teachers blame teachers for not teaching well.
I would suggest to all those who do that, to go back to college, get a degree and than
teach in this country.

This culture and school system has a major issue with instant gratification.
That is what brainetics can do. And that's all.

If you consider memorizing math tricks as learning math, that as a parent I would
rather ask yourself if not maybe the fault of kids performance is rooted somewhere
else than the faculty.

If you need to learn and understand a concept and rules there is not other way around
it than learning it.

Shortcuts will not do that.

This is also why besides standardized tests college students have less good English
and learning skills than I have while English is not my native language.
Please research the PISA test and ask yourself why the results are that way.

This product is such a no brainer I cannot even understand why people take it serious.
Of course are there ways to calculate in your head faster. You do not need brainetics for that.
Plus I would like to know how memorization will help later with complex math problems.
Ever asked yourself that?

This is such a media addicted culture in this country it is already sad to see.
This product is advertised on a paid TV channel. Would you buy a college degree also from QVC?


Man man man - learn to use your own brain first please.

answered by Guest | 06-14-2010 at 08:28 AM

What makes me however upset are parents who blame teachers for not teaching.

As I said I teach college and the level of lack of attendance, professionalism
is just cruel.

I as a professor do NOT have to teach my students how to do homework,
how to plan their time, how to solve their private life.

I am there to teach them what they want to study.

However parents often I dont think expect, they simply dont know the poor
level their students are performing at.

I as a parent would be embarrassed - but well only in the USA do parents go with
their kids to visit a future college and ask the questions for them.

Give me a break - those kids would not even get into High School in European schools
because they would not be mature enough.

answered by Guest | 06-14-2010 at 08:33 AM

donnamusic

you are my hero - somebody who knows what they are talking about.

answered by Guest | 06-14-2010 at 09:15 AM

Single parent of 3
Okay, there is so many negatives on this post, about whether or not this product really "teaches" math. I just decided to purchase this product anyway about a minute ago. LOL I'm going to test it on my 3 kids who are 6, 11, and 15. I can understand how some people think that these are just math "tricks" and not really teaching steps and concepts. I can agree with that. But I'm more interested in how the professor taught those kids to remember those letters. That was simply remarkable. For that reason only, I think this would be a great product to try. Everything we learn is based on memory. My son will forget every step to a math problem he has learned in a matter of days. I am constantly reteaching the same things. So if this product can help him memorize the steps he needs to do the problems I would be very happy!

answered by Guest | 06-14-2010 at 12:20 PM

Not a scam but seriously not the holy grail to math either.
It is interesting to read that this method is being defended as the better system.

Different approaches to math and in this case addition, multiplication, subtraction
are all valid.


However what nobody here seems to really understand is the methodology about
how to start teaching and establishing understanding of the subject matter.

13X12
------
130
+26
------
156

This might be considered the old way by some posters. However visually you can
already grasp the steps and understanding why 13X12 is 156.
This is also called breaking a bigger problem down into smaller problems.
This is the best way to actually explain how math works.

Vedic math on the other hand is not a good way to communicate how math works.
It is a great shortcut to specific math situations in the are of addition, subtraction,
multiplication, and division. Higher math is already a different subject since it would
require a different approach.

Take a look at this simple line:

13X12 > 13+2= 15 > 3x2=6 >> 156

Yes in deed it is fast, however is it logical? Does it make sense? Does it self explain why
it works this way. Can you extract mathematical rules from this?
The honest answer to this is actually no.

Teaching a young student shortcuts and declare it as generating fun in math is not only
in terms of teaching a failure but also morally and ethically questionable.

What happens when a problem is provided which is not memorized or cannot be solved
with shortcuts? This is a common scenario in math. You would let them grow up with
a wrong impression about them-selfs and also hinder them from learning math right.

Quickly being able to calculate the square of 43 is not equal being able to solve text based
math problems such as when you have 28 tables how many groups of 4 can you form.

This is actually not only a math problem it is also a conceptual problem to solve because
it does not allow to fall back on shortcuts but rather requires to build up the skill of
abstraction.

If you can think abstractly and know the basics a changing problem situation should not
be an issue.

Once the foundation is build those shortcuts can be of great help in deed.
But stating that you can teach math with it and make children understand math is wrong.

To mention I have connections to India where this method comes from.
My friend who works on his PhD in math education in the US knows the problem of low scores
of the US school system. In the PISA study the USA is pathetically low behind every other
European industrialized country.

He also observed as I did that memorization and learning for standardized tests are nothing
else than improving score rates. What most of you do not understand is that scoring high
on those tests has nothing to do with being able to proof that you understand what you
can do. A grade is not a usable indicator to asses the acquired knowledge.

The school system in the US is flawed and sadly that is hard to change. It starts from funding
issues to wrong teaching methods and ends with the standardized score tests.

According to my Asian friends those who know Vedic math never started with it first.
It was introduced in a later state when enough basic math understanding was acquired
that such an abstract approach can utilized correctly.

In a European country the high school exams can cover anything from the past 4 years
and thus you start month before to prepare to study for them. With mass memorization
you will not get very far. The eat or die mentality, which might sound harsh has the
side effect that it forces you to learn right.

But this is also 2010 and with the internet you have the ability to have access to many
useful teaching materials online often also for free.

So if you are concerned about your kids education it is up to your responsibility to investigate in this are - but please utilize more serious means than believing in ad shown on a paid TV channel.

If you want your child to grow you need to lead them first. And as I mentioned today you have more resources on your finger tips than ever before.

BTW I came to this thread because I was researching Brainetics because it reminded me about Scientology.

answered by Guest | 06-14-2010 at 08:29 PM

if you think that this product is helping your son to better
memorize math since it forgets it so fast you are sadly mistaken.

The issue might be somewhere else.

answered by Guest | 06-14-2010 at 08:30 PM

Who's to say they cannot learn the theory and reasoning?
Really. You are writing as though they cannot understand those concepts as well as their math mechanics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest View Post
Brainetics is detrimental to a child's mathematical development. Sure, its nice to learn "tricks" to multiply squared values of numbers, and that might get them through elementary school and middle school (maybe), but once these children start going to high school and doing trigonometry, high-leveled algebra, and calculus, they will "crash and burn" simply because they do not understand why 25 x 25 equals 625 or why they got the answers they got when using brainetics.
Also, learning squared valued is nice, but realistically, squared values are hardly ever needed in real life.
Like someone above said, this is just an instant gratification product. I have no doubt that this product does what it says it does. Memorization techniques do work and I'm sure that anyone who uses this product will be able to multiply 945x945 within seconds, but when asked to find the derivative of x^5 or to find the sin(pi/2), they will expect a shortcut to be provided for them, and when it isn't, they will get frustrated, their self-esteem will go down, their grades will go down, and they will be tremendously behind all of the other students in their class who didn't use Brainetics.
An argument to this might be that anyone who isn't getting a degree in Mathematics, doesn't need to know derivatives, trigonometry or algebra. But, kids learn trigonometry, calculus, and algebra in high school. Algebra is required for graduation in most states. Also, for anyone who took Geometry, it is almost entirely proofs, or proving that what happens actually happens. A child who uses Brainetics without the proper background will not understand why math works, only that math works
Brainetics is nothing but a cheap trick that hinders the mind and prevents children from developing skills in critical thinking, which IS used everywhere, everyday, no matter what your lifestyle or career.

- Mathematician

answered by Guest | 06-18-2010 at 05:21 PM

I agree with your last statements.
Shortcuts can also be taught along with theory. Children can learn both at the same time. Why the sweat about the two?
As for the time spent at home, kudos to anyone who has the backbone and goal and does it. Too many people are not tuned in to learning. Sad.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest View Post
Plain and Simple - The Answer isn't Everything. They teach that in school all the time in all subjects. That's why teachers make their students "Show Their Work".

Brainetics is about just getting the answer.

Also, to those of you asking for someone to try and the product and post their results. Every single post of someone who tried it will be that their child succeeded, because that's what it appears like initially. No one will truly see the effects of this product for several years, when these kids get to high school. Then we will all see that Brainetics is not the solution. It just like studying the long term effects of a new medication. We cant do it, because it hasn't existed long enough to study its long term effects. But, the foundation on which Brainetics is based is not conclusive for effective for the development of mathematical and critical thinking skills.

If you want your child to do better in math or school in general, turn off the TV, turn off the video games, sit down with your child and help them. Even if you aren't a math genius, you can help an elementary school child with their math homework. And if you don't understand it, find someone who does, like a tutor. Stop blaming the teacher, stop going for the "quick and easy fix", and do it yourself. Be proactive and legitimately help your child succeed.

Hard work is the solution, not Brainetics.

answered by Guest | 06-18-2010 at 05:26 PM

Agree 100%. This is not replacement for standard techniques. It "makes kids more interested in math". OK, sure, great. It "amazes your friends". OK, great. Kinda cool but kids need fundamentals.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest View Post
I don't think it trains the steps of a math problem. It might teach via memory, but I don't think the course actually teaches to work through problems of higher math.
We can simply look at the following math problem and can easily figure it out without doing the steps, but it's more important to understand the steps taken to derive the answer.
1+X=3

You can easily see the answer X=2. If you don't know the steps to come up with the answer, how can anyone work through the more difficult math subjects.

Sure it's cute to do parlor tricks with math, squaring numbers and the like, but in reality, children need to be taught where the answer came from and how to work that out. Too many times are we wanting instant gratification for things. Our society has been built on the need to have the answer instantly, without understanding it. Without the deeper levels of thinking, and working down a problem, a society will never reach full potential.

I don't think it's a scam, but i don't think it fully works as advertised, either.

answered by Guest | 06-19-2010 at 11:40 AM

I just want to say that I am a 12 year old and I've just started to use this. It is AWESOME! I've learned so much, and this is not a scam in any way. Sure, you DO need to learn all of the basics first. I was already a straight a student, but this has made me take much less time on homework and such. I have fallen asleep in class several times unfortunately (haha) because it is all so easy. My classmates do not understand as I do. This is fun, and trust me I am not a nerd in any sense. I have however completed my mother's algebra textbooks when I was 8. This is fun to learn during summer and weekends, which I do. But it should never be used alone-you need the basics first.

answered by Guest | 06-19-2010 at 05:58 PM

Motivation
Kids learn because they want to. Some kids need motivation. Success comes from small steps with positive outcomes. You may argue all day about whether this program is a scam. But let's talk first about opportunity cost. How much is your child worth to you? How much did you spend buying yourself lunch during the working day in the past six months? $6? Okay 20 days a month x 6 months is 120 days. 120 days x $6 a day is $720. Make your lunch and bring it to work $2 a day is $240. That is a $500 savings in six months. If you are lucky enough and can find ways to decrease your daily spending (reduce the movie channels on your cable subscription), you can give your kid a chance by taking some risk. Odds are anything you try is a better motivator than eating out or watching a movie. Really - who is getting scammed here? The kid whose parent can't change their behavior, take a risk and help their child or the child?

I see we were all able to answer the random math question at the bottom of the input box.

answered by Guest | 06-23-2010 at 12:18 PM

I have the Brainetics program at home
After reading many comments I realized that most people are just commenting to comment and not because they have something to say. I have this program in my home but I did not purchase it. (My mother did.) I have not seen the infomercial or the 20/20 special. I started this program with no bias at all. Let me also make it clear that I have not finished all the discs. I am in the middle of the third disc. I am a mathematically minded person and see patterns in many things others do not. I have tutored college students in math (while in school) and currently tutor middle school students. My 11 year old daughter is watching it with me.

Some criticisms:
It is just parlor tricks. Yes and no. Yes there are some fun and cool tricks taught at the beginning of the program. He clearly states in the first section that math is all about patterns. Doing the magic squares demonstrates that. Once people begin to see the patterns in math they begin to see that it isn't a new problem every time, it is a pattern. We all know that any number ending with a zero is divisible by ten. Is that a trick? It is a pattern because our math is base ten. Another reason for these "parlor tricks" is to get the kids excited. This morning I should one of my students a couple of tricks. He was amazed by them and couldn't wait to go show other people. Did he learn much from that? Maybe not, but it gives him confidence to move forward in his learning and to have a positive attitude about math.

It costs too much. Seriously? Some people have their priorities all out of whack. I have had a Wii for more than a year and we still only have three remotes. One day I am sure we will buy another one so four people can play mario kart at once but right now there are much higher priorities. I recognize that the actual cost of the product is low (5 discs, a pack of cards, flashcards, a small book, etc.) but since when do we not pay for someone's expertise? You don't hesitate to pay others for their expertise (lawyers, financial advisors, etc.) so why not give Mike Byster something for his knowledge?

It teaches instant gratification. Maybe these people are much faster learners than me but I am not getting this instantly. In the section I watched yesterday we learned to multiply 2 digit numbers in the forties, fifties and nineties, and also ending with a 1. We also learned to square numbers ending with 5. Each of these methods has a different set of steps to learn. We stopped the DVD at that point and worked the problems in the book. My daughter and I had to help each other remember the steps for each and we also had to look at the book. I'm not saying this effort wasn't worth it but it certainly isn't instant gratification. This morning we did more problems to review and did much better.

It isn't complete and will damage children. I have heard nowhere (from the program) that this is supposed to replace 12 years of math education. Believe me, it would cost a lot more if it was meant to be comprehensive. This program is meant to show you how to do arithmetics quicker (just like memorizing the multiplication tables) without using a calculator. I have seen far too much reliance on calculators and when I take them away from the students they freak out. This program would give them much more confidence. As for the requirement to know the multiplication tables, that is required because this program builds on that. Maybe he could have made the program start at an earlier level but he didn't. It is what it is. As for harming children, I can't see how being able to do quick calculations in their heads is going to prevent them from understanding algebra. Like I said earlier, this is not meant to replace 12 years of education and no claim has been made to that effect.

It doesn't work. This is the flip side of the instant gratification. Just like anything in life this has to be practiced. You would never watch a dvd about how to play the piano and expect to sit down and play perfectly the first time. you would have to practice. This is the same. You have to practice the problems. One criticism I have is I would like more problems in the book. This isn't a really big criticism because it is easy to make up your own problems and use a calculator (or by hand) to check the answers.

I can't think of anything else I have read to comment on. Like everything worth doing, this will take some effort but I think it is worth it. If you truly don't have the money don't buy it, but I would be willing to bet you could find $10 a week to put into a fund and in a few months buy the program. But just like exercise equipment, if you don't use it it will do you no good.

answered by Guest | 06-24-2010 at 05:57 PM

concerned parent
What age/grade level should Brainetics be started?

answered by Guest | 06-24-2010 at 11:34 PM

I agreed that Brainetics is a shortcut. Sure it's great to get an answer within seconds, but if someone doesn't know the basic concepts, it'll fall on deaf ears. In high school and college, I was required to show work to get full credit. Brainetics may help me get the answer quicker, but just showing the answer (even the correct one) won't give me full credit.


On another note, I find it hilarious are the posts that criticize others who said Brainetics is too "expensive," especially the one who said why do people spend money on lawyers than Brainetics. I guess you everyone should stop spending money on food, car repairs, utility bills, lawyers, plumbers, entertainment, etc and GO OUT AND BUY BRAINETICS!

answered by Guest | 06-27-2010 at 12:22 PM

There are 90 something odd quotes here and how many are actual reviews by people who actually bought the product?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest View Post
After reading many comments I realized that most people are just commenting to comment and not because they have something to say. I have this program in my home but I did not purchase it. (My mother did.) I have not seen the infomercial or the 20/20 special. I started this program with no bias at all. Let me also make it clear that I have not finished all the discs. I am in the middle of the third disc. I am a mathematically minded person and see patterns in many things others do not. I have tutored college students in math (while in school) and currently tutor middle school students. My 11 year old daughter is watching it with me.

Some criticisms:
It is just parlor tricks. Yes and no. Yes there are some fun and cool tricks taught at the beginning of the program. He clearly states in the first section that math is all about patterns. Doing the magic squares demonstrates that. Once people begin to see the patterns in math they begin to see that it isn't a new problem every time, it is a pattern. We all know that any number ending with a zero is divisible by ten. Is that a trick? It is a pattern because our math is base ten. Another reason for these "parlor tricks" is to get the kids excited. This morning I should one of my students a couple of tricks. He was amazed by them and couldn't wait to go show other people. Did he learn much from that? Maybe not, but it gives him confidence to move forward in his learning and to have a positive attitude about math.

It costs too much. Seriously? Some people have their priorities all out of whack. I have had a Wii for more than a year and we still only have three remotes. One day I am sure we will buy another one so four people can play mario kart at once but right now there are much higher priorities. I recognize that the actual cost of the product is low (5 discs, a pack of cards, flashcards, a small book, etc.) but since when do we not pay for someone's expertise? You don't hesitate to pay others for their expertise (lawyers, financial advisors, etc.) so why not give Mike Byster something for his knowledge?

It teaches instant gratification. Maybe these people are much faster learners than me but I am not getting this instantly. In the section I watched yesterday we learned to multiply 2 digit numbers in the forties, fifties and nineties, and also ending with a 1. We also learned to square numbers ending with 5. Each of these methods has a different set of steps to learn. We stopped the DVD at that point and worked the problems in the book. My daughter and I had to help each other remember the steps for each and we also had to look at the book. I'm not saying this effort wasn't worth it but it certainly isn't instant gratification. This morning we did more problems to review and did much better.

It isn't complete and will damage children. I have heard nowhere (from the program) that this is supposed to replace 12 years of math education. Believe me, it would cost a lot more if it was meant to be comprehensive. This program is meant to show you how to do arithmetics quicker (just like memorizing the multiplication tables) without using a calculator. I have seen far too much reliance on calculators and when I take them away from the students they freak out. This program would give them much more confidence. As for the requirement to know the multiplication tables, that is required because this program builds on that. Maybe he could have made the program start at an earlier level but he didn't. It is what it is. As for harming children, I can't see how being able to do quick calculations in their heads is going to prevent them from understanding algebra. Like I said earlier, this is not meant to replace 12 years of education and no claim has been made to that effect.

It doesn't work. This is the flip side of the instant gratification. Just like anything in life this has to be practiced. You would never watch a dvd about how to play the piano and expect to sit down and play perfectly the first time. you would have to practice. This is the same. You have to practice the problems. One criticism I have is I would like more problems in the book. This isn't a really big criticism because it is easy to make up your own problems and use a calculator (or by hand) to check the answers.

I can't think of anything else I have read to comment on. Like everything worth doing, this will take some effort but I think it is worth it. If you truly don't have the money don't buy it, but I would be willing to bet you could find $10 a week to put into a fund and in a few months buy the program. But just like exercise equipment, if you don't use it it will do you no good.
Thank you to those with legitimate reviews and actual EXPERIENCE with this product. This one seemed especially comprehensive. I may either buy this system, or just find a book on vedic math.

answered by Guest | 07-01-2010 at 10:54 AM

On behalf of Guest 2-28-2010 - Kudos!!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest View Post
It is easy for people to say that you need to understand how to work through the problem but, what about the children who struggle really badly in math and just have a hard time understanding the steps. You also have the issues of teachers these days who don't take the time to try different methods with the children who are struggling and then they end up failing or the parents end up forking out the money to get the extra help that the child needs. What happened to the Motto no child left behind? I feel like this Brainetics is hope for those children. I have a child who has never gotten anything higher than a D in math and no one seems to want to help her. I have asked the school several times to put her in a help class that assists them with the help that she needs to understand it but, it just seems to do nothing. My child is in the 5th grade and she has been struggling with math since she started math in first grade. I feel like they are stressing these children out with all the pressure in school and don't allow them to be kids. I think this also has a lot to do with the whole ADHD epidemic. No one has time, patience for these children anymore. All the teachers say is more money or you need to pay for your Child's education in order for them to get a higher learning education. Just like the homework thing why do these children come home with tons of homework, what are they doing in class? I did not go to school to become a teacher how am I supposed to help my child if I don't understand how to explain in detail how a problem works? Isn’t this what the teacher gets paid to do? Why does my child get told that they ask too many questions? Is this not what teachers go to college for? You should never tell a child they ask too many questions this is a discouragement for child to hear that.
I could not have said it any better... Lots of boxed-in minds out there. I guess this is why we have a language that includes words such as different, unique, varied and beyond. Surely to alert those fumbling in their allegorical caves stuck in mimic mode identifying with some jackassed idea of 'the status quo' to perhaps look up and notice the source of their ignorance. I am sure that I can still use a rock to crush a nut, but I also know that my advanced nutcracking tool can be used just as well, or maybe my trusty hammer... one will suit me just fine. The more, the merrier.

answered by Guest | 07-03-2010 at 11:12 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest View Post
the infomercial that I saw on TV listed the 5-DVD set (with books, etc) for $14.95. While reading these comments I thought "Maybe I saw that wrong," but then one of these later posts said $14.95 as well. I wonder why the change? *shrug*

The infomercial states that you can purchase Brainetics on TRIAL for 30 days for $14.95 which basically covers shipping and handling. If you go with the trial, it's $14.95 up front and then one payment of $149.95 after the trial expires (30 days). If you purchase Brainetics in full up front, it's $149.95 with free shipping. The website claims to work or you get your money back, but even after searching, I didn't see the time frame listed for a money-back return, those offers are usually 30 days.

If I could add my .02 to the whole parent vs. teacher argument...as a homeschool parent I have always felt it was the parent's responsibility to ensure their children are learning. Yes, our taxpayer dollars are providing the income for public school teachers, but they don't often get to choose the curriculum or the methodology and are teaching 20-30 kids of widely varying intellectual capacities, attention spans and maturity levels. The "test" is usually their end game. Because I knew I would have to teach them, I got busy and relearned the information myself - my responsibility and no one elses. No matter where your children learn; at home, private or public school, and no matter who is involved in their education, the final, absolute responsibility for their education rests with the parents until they are of an age and maturity level to take that responsibility for themselves. It's wonderful when our kids get a teacher that motivates them and inspires them to excellence, but those teachers are few and far between. For all the other run-of-the-mill teachers, it isn't for us to blame and condemn, but rather to step up to the plate and fill the void, which means possibly having to learn right along with our kids, and sometimes that means taking a chance on spending our hard-earned dollars on programs or products that help us accomplish that goal. I can't tell you how much money I've spent on homeschool programs that just didn't work for us. No big deal, I turned around and sold them and used that money buy something else until we found what did work. If ANY teacher told me not to teach my kids because the "techniques" are different, I would tell that teacher to kiss my lily-white a$$ because I'm going to do whatever it takes to teach my kids to think, even if that means using a different method. Too many parents are afraid of failing or falling short that they don't attempt to do anything at all educate their own kids. Get over it! Learn something new! Get out of your comfort zone! They are YOUR kids, not the school systems!
Now let me jump off my soapbox to say that I have not personally reviewed this particular product, but like many others have said, I see Brainetics as a supplement to a good math program that teaches foundational concepts, not as a stand-alone cure for the math phobic.

answered by Guest | 07-05-2010 at 05:45 PM

Detrimental?
No type of learning is detrimental. It's only troubling if this is the only type of mathematical instruction -- which no one is suggesting. Also memorization is an excellent work out for the brain. Any and all types of mental stimulation are useful and positive.

answered by Guest | 07-07-2010 at 06:41 PM

Learning Tricks
It sounds as though this would make a good supplement to a math program/curriculum. We all learn tricks and shortcuts, such as counting the zeros when multiplying problems like:
200 x 300 = 60,000.

This only truly works, however, when the concepts related to place value are truly mastered. In the end, it won't matter what tricks Brainetics or any other program or person teach children if they have not mastered basic facts and concepts on which to build. Their foundation will be filled with holes that won't hold up when moving on to advanced math. Just like with magic shows, tricks are based on illusion.

answered by Guest | 07-12-2010 at 01:42 PM

What a waste
My PhD is from the University of Florida and my cognate is Learning Theory and mathematics. Think about it--how useful is it in 2010 to be able to add and multiple complex numbers in your head? Exactly what does this teach young people other than to engage in the parlor tricks that themselves are 300 years old. We have children getting excited about deriving answers while not learning anything about the deeper structure of mathematics.

For parents-- what is a prime number?
For parents-- why is learning what a prime number important?

For parents-- if you child ask you why learning algebra, trigonometry, and calculus was important -- what would you say.

For parents-- grow up and start to think.

answered by joshuasail | 07-13-2010 at 06:16 AM

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